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the-wolfbats:

Can we have another “Type the following words into your tags box, then post the first automatic tag that comes up.” post with the words

  • their 
  • okay
  • but
  • though
  • say
  • no
  • and
  • left
  • around
  • me
thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 
I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 

I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

(Source: wine-loving-vagabond)

moonkistprincess:

elexuscal:

the-wonders-of-unreality:

If you haven’t taken the ‘Which Citizen of Night Vale are You?’ test then you’re missing out. 

oh god i got Steve Carlsburg

I’m just going to sit and try to work out what went wrong in my life

i got intern dana!!!! <3

I got Kevin.  Surprisingly, I am okay with this.

To all the Tumblr users who tend to use tags very liberally:

thejadedkiwano:

Let’s play a game.

Type the following words into your tags box, then post the first automatic tag that comes up.

you

also

what

when

why

how

look

because

never

Be nice to Hotel Staff, please.

cannibalcoalition:

Convention season is creeping up on us like a big, creeping… thing. And this means that thousands of like-minded individuals will cram themselves, six to a room, into hotels and convention centers and forgetting basic hygiene in favor of socializing with people who actually get them. (Which brings me to the next point: please shower.)

Hotels detest large groups of people because while they do bring in money they also mean heaps of trouble most of the time. If there’s enough trouble, they can actually refuse to house cons in the future- and we don’t want that. Hotel jobs are not easy and they don’t always pay well, so here’s some pointers on how to make it easier on your hosts:

  • give tips when you can. Desk staff, breakfast hosts, and housekeeping all accept tips. Even if its a dollar. It can really make a person’s day, and that’s important.
  • If you’re hanging out in the lobby and the janitor looks like they’re going to start cleaning, please allow them leeway to clean. They can’t vacuum if you’re on the carpet, they can’t mop if you’re on the tile. Which means that they have to wait, which means overtime, which usually results in hours for the next week being docked and that’s really very inconvenient.
  • If you’re going to be arriving late (closer to 10pm or later), call the hotel and let them know- particularly if its a lot of people.
  • You are not the only people in the hotel. It may seem like the only guests at your hotel are fellow con-goers, but its rare that one event reserves the whole building. There’s usually at least one very confused grandmother. Keep the noise levels down, comply if there is a noise complaint against you.
  • Keep messes in public areas to a minimum, clean up what you can. Let staff know. If something is broken in your room, let staff know.
  • You may get a survey emailed to you. Fill it out when you get a chance: we actually do read your comments. Make a point of remembering names of staff that were particularly helpful- they get rewarded.
  • Overall, be polite and patient with the staff- you don’t know how many problems they’ve had to deal with in one day. Usually by the time check-in rolls around its been a lot.

Other than that, keep safe and have fun!

-Lee

WHAT DO YOU MEAN I MISSED YOU AT WONDERCON. *flail* Man, I would have died if I saw your RGB costume. That thing is fabulous. You are fabulous. Continue being fabulous.

Awww, thank you! I was only there for Saturday, but my family wants to attend Friday and Saturday next year

Look who decided to join me at Wondercon!

Look who decided to join me at Wondercon!

thereliquary:

#SMPTE Man! #wondercon

Hey look, it&#8217;s me!

The character is RGB, from The Property of Hate.  It&#8217;s by modmad, and you should totally check it out.

thereliquary:

#SMPTE Man! #wondercon

Hey look, it’s me! The character is RGB, from The Property of Hate. It’s by modmad, and you should totally check it out.

metazensae:

What is this magnificent creature?!?!

This is a secretary bird!  It’s a predatory species found in Africa.  They might look ridiculous and adorable when they run, but these guys are actually four-foot badasses who stomp some of Africa’s deadliest snakes into unconsciousness before eating them!

(Source: fat-birds.com)

If you see me at a con:

totalspiffage:

  • Please say hi
  • Please introduce yourself
  • I want to meet you too
  • If you’d like a hug, just ask
  • Unless you’re in unsealed body paint
  • Photos are cool too.
  • I WANT TO SAY HELLO TO PEOPLE IN PERSON LIKE OMFG I LOVE MEETING PEOPLE AT CONS